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Speed training is a powerful tool for golfers looking to improve their handicap. Here’s why:
 
  1. Increased clubhead speed leads to longer drives. According to a study published in the Journal of Sports Sciences, a 1 mph increase in clubhead speed can lead to an average increase of 2.7 yards in driving distance (1). This can be especially beneficial for golfers with slower swing speeds, as they may struggle to hit the ball as far as their counterparts.
  2. Faster swing speeds can lead to lower scores. In the same study, it was found that golfers with faster swing speeds had significantly lower scores than those with slower swing speeds (1). This is likely due to the fact that they are able to hit the ball further and thus have shorter approach shots into the green.
  3. Speed training can improve overall golf fitness. Golf is a physically demanding sport, and improved physical fitness can lead to better performance on the course. Speed training exercises such as medicine ball throws and plyometrics can help golfers build strength and power in the muscles used in their golf swing.
  4. Speed training can improve swing mechanics. Proper swing mechanics are essential for consistent, accurate shots. Speed training can help golfers learn to generate power in their swing through the use of proper body mechanics, leading to more consistent shots and lower scores.
 
Overall, speed training can be a valuable addition to a golfer’s training regimen. By improving clubhead speed, physical fitness, and swing mechanics, golfers can see significant improvements in their handicap and overall performance on the course.
 
References:
 
  1. Thompson, K. G., Gordon, S., & Keogh, J. W. (2008). The effect of clubhead speed on driving distance in golf: A pilot study. Journal of Sports Sciences, 26(12), 1295-1301.
Why Speed Training

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